Research

Relatively few biological studies have been carried out in the Pacific Equatorial Forest, which means that there is a lot yet to be discovered and learned. With only 2% of native forest still intact, there is an added sense of urgency, as biological extinctions and extirpations are already underway. Attracting researchers to the Jama-Coaque Reserve (JCR) is a high priority of this project. It is our goal to transform our Research Station into one of the premier sites for biological investigation in the tropics. Click below for more information:

Past Research Highlights
  • Herpetologist Paul S. Hamilton from The Biodiversity Group has discovered 40 new species of frog, one new species of snake, and one new species of salamander in JCR and nearby forest fragments since 2009—all of which were previously unknown to science.
  • We’ve been managing five experimental reforestation and agroforestation sites since 2010, including 26 species of native canopy trees and 50 species of food-producing trees.
  • Our on-going camera trap survey in JCR since 2011 has registered over 20 species of mammals, including three species of wild felines (ocelot, margay, and jaguarundi).
  • In 2012, resident biologist Mike Ellis identified 221 bird species in JCR, three of which are listed as Endangered, six are listed as Vulnerable, and five are listed as Near Threatened. This research prompted BirdLife International to redraw the boundaries of the Important Bird Area (IBA) in which JCR resides. Out of the 107 IBA’s in Ecuador, only two have more globally threatened species than JCR’s IBA.
  • The national botany team from the Ecuadorian Ministry of Environment conducted a botanical inventory in two sample plots in JCR as part of a national vegetation survey in 2012.
TBG Press Release 2009--30 New Frog Species
View from the Jama-Coaque Biological Station lecture deck.
View from the Jama-Coaque Biological Station lecture deck.
Birds Found at Jama-Coaque
Bamboo House and Jama-Coaque Biological Research Station from the air.
Bamboo House and Jama-Coaque Biological Research Station from the air.
Mammals Caught on Camera
Executive Director Ryan and Intern Coordinator Eva photograph a land crab.
Executive Director Ryan and Intern Coordinator Eva photograph a land crab.