Where We Work

The Jama-Coaque Reserve

The Pacific Equatorial Forest is comprised of the various different types of tropical forest that inhabit the lowlands of coastal Ecuador. Only 2% of native forest still remains in this ecosystem, rendering it among the most threatened tropical forests in the world. The Jama-Coaque Reserve (JCR), in the western province of Manabí, protects one of the last major remnants.

History of the Reserve
Welcome to Jama-Coaque Reserve, and the community of Camarones!
Welcome to Jama-Coaque Reserve, and the community of Camarones!
The above map shows the current boundaries (yellow) of the Jama-Coaque Reserve in the province of Manabí, in western Ecuador. The red shows where we hope to expand in the next five years.
The above map shows the current boundaries (yellow) of the Jama-Coaque Reserve in the province of Manabí, in western Ecuador. The red shows where we hope to expand in the next five years.

Convergence of Humboldt and El Niño

The Pacific Equatorial Forest is located at the convergence of the Humboldt and El Niño ocean currents, bound between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes Mountains, and at the transition zone between the wettest forests and the driest desert in the world. As a result, the Pacific Equatorial Forest is endowed with high rates of biological endemism and characterized by a wide diversity of forest types in very close proximity, including premontane cloud forest, humid forest, moist forest, semi-deciduous, deciduous forest (i.e., tropical dry forest), and mangrove forest.

Climate & Topography

Biodiversity Hotspot

The Pacific Equatorial Forest is part of the Tumbes-Chocó-Magdalena Biodiversity Hotspot, as designated by Conservation International, which runs from Panama to Peru, with Colombia and Ecuador in between. The Jama-Coaque Reserve is located at the Tumbes-Chocó ecological transition point, which straddles two Endemic Bird Areas. Specifically, JCR represents a significant portion of Important Bird Area EC010.

The primary threat to the forest is agricultural expansion, particularly cattle ranching, African palm oil plantations, and shrimp farming, as well as illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture.

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